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20121222
20121222
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, portland, toronto, chicago, tampa as some large cities that have sunday meter parking polices. the rationale for the sunday meter parking policy includes reduced frustration for all motorists. more successful neighborhood commercial district, which rely on parking available for customers. reduces congestion and all revenue returned to to mta. there is a question about how the meters operate if you have to run out there at noon to feed the meter and the answer is that the meters will accept pre-payment beginning at 4:00 a.m. and so you can make a pre-payment and then starting at noon, the payment that you make will take effect. and then there is the parking meter rates will be the sames on sunday. i included in your binders, there is -- i will put it on the overhead -- -- the sfmta is undertaking a public outreach program providing the form that i just put on the overhead. they are going to be printing tens of thousands of those. and have them available for local businesses to hand out to customers. there is also very similar design for 11x17 posters along with cash regist
communities who have even fewer resources than the large cities, less expertise. if you take options off the table, it will be, well, what we've done for the last 40 years, and right now we have some real challenges. so any good manager is going to want to have a maximum number of options. allbee: you've got to have a serious conversation with your constituency about what it costs to deliver the service that you're required to deliver and to deliver the service that they want. paolicelli: and i think, ultimately, the responsibility is going to be down to the user of this commodity. it costs money to operate these systems. there's a need to continually invest in these systems. there's going to be new regulations. it's all going to cost money. allbee: for all practical purposes, people are going to have to pay about twice as much for these services as they currently do. because a lot of the pipe that went in, a lot of the plants that went in, went in with very sizable portions of federal grant money, mechanisms that are no longer in place. narrator: without grants, utilities often turn to
you some of the figures. large cities produce 83% of economic output in the united states. the 30 largest cities in the u.s. account for half of all gdp. now, we're all in favor of good infrastructure until it comes time to pay for it. you say that some money can come from the private sector, but we've had some high-profile examples of public/private partnerships that have gone wrong. how do city governments make sure that city residents get what they pay for? >> i don't think there's any simple answer to this. and by the way, one reason when he we might want a national infrastructure bank is not for the money but just to provide oversight and ombudsman so that you have somebody to go to when off project or regulator, an interlocutor perhaps. we should definitely allow private money. there is an additional problem, and richard probably knows more about this, about so-called eminent domain, where you can't just clear things out. in china, they used to at least just knock on your door and say you're moving, we're building here a road here. you have to move out of your parm tomorrow.
serving sector of the economy which has largely declined in recent years and what is your plan to create wage jobs in industries to prevent the city's work class from being displaced for the newer upper increase jobs and the high-tech jobs financial and provision service cities? >>> thank you supervisor and i'm glad to here and i join you in the effort of using social media to community with our constituent. >> let me start by saying that we have come off of the worst economic downturn when i took office last year the unemployment rate was 9.6%. that has now changed to eight% since 2011 and that is growing at a 6.6% pace, there are still more than 32,000 unemployed san franciscoians which i find unacceptable and we must do better i want to spill investor confidence and show businesses of all sites that we can start stay here. this year we are reformed from payroll tax and i heard that previous payroll tax hurt job growth and i agreed and propyl vision e was passed this last november and because of proposition e san francisco standards to ads more new private sector jobs and that is
, large sections of kansas city on both the kansas and missouri sides will be wired. >> this is salt lake what you wanted. >> exactly -- this is exactly what you guys wanted. >> exactly. we want to take advantage of the faster speeds that google fire will bring and develop. the sky's the limit. >> reporter: how high is that? even the tech wizards aren't sure. >> you know, we've been asked that question a few times. the truthful answer is we don't know yet. we have a new technology that no one else has in the nation, and it can take our business to a new height that we didn't even dream of. >> reporter: the practical effects are easier to predict. better property values, more reasons for investment for top talent to come and stay. how much impact can all of this have on your city? >> i think at the end of the day if you ask any mayor growing that small business, finding that entrepreneur, willing to take a risk in your community is going to grow jobs and ultimately the economy. >> reporter: for now, dreams are growing wild out on the silicon prairie. tom foreman, cnn, kansas city, kansas.
was just killed yesterday on biel and market. i'm shocked that this city would really think that this project, on fell street, and oak street, with such a large number of folks who are impacted, should be approved without some kind of an environmental review. i have worked in the environmental review area at various times -- >> president chiu: thank you very much. next speaker. >> my name is -- i live and work in that neighborhood, and i own a business at the corner of oak and divis. i'm also shocked there is no review at all of the impact on the streets and the delivery systems and all the things that are happening in that area. if you even try to block the streets with some cones and test it out for a minute to see what the real impact is, it will probably give us a better picture of what this feels and looks like. i've been delivering in that area for -- since -- at least 15, 18 years. and i drive through that street all the time, day in and day out. and i really feel like a real true study is very important to that area. i'm all for the safety of the bikers and i'm all f
itself up in cities and on the coasts. it brought me back to square one and keeping my curiosity on the systems and not just the internet, but power and aviation and the large complicated things that we depend on so much. >> "tubes" is the name of the book. andrew blum is the author. this is "communicators" on c- span. >> sometimes he was a cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. many of his age and class, they're not going to apologize to a young and private secretary. he had a way of turning the tables. his version of an apology would be to say, well, i am a kind man and you are doing a good job today. but the issue was never settled. he always had to get the
to get to ocean much faster. narrator: cities throughout southern california converted natural rivers to these concrete channels, part of their storm drain systems. this allowed expanding development without the need for large flood plains. kharaghani: the los angeles river is approximately 51 miles. concrete reduces the size of the river that you need to carry the water because it speeds up the flow of water. if you'd like to remove all the concrete and to have natural system to carry the water to protect you from flooding, you need to have almost one mile on each side of the river set aside for transport of rain. so in order for the city to have use of those lands around the river, concrete made it possible to have minimum land so the water can be carried to the ocean in the fastest possible way. but, unfortunately, because of population growth and poor housekeeping, people are putting a lot of pollutants on the street and the streets are the openings to our stormwater sewer system. in an average year, 4,000 to 5,000 tons of trash ends up in long beach. man: we've created a system t
area where you will find a lot of gun violence and if you look at some cities, some urban areas where there are large numbers of gun deaths, it's not because of mental illness. it's because of the drug trade, the drug business, of course, and crime. >> isn't there a part of it that people who are witnessing and dealing with those environments and who are living through these shootings, then there is an issue with mental illness. a kid growing up in that environment -- >> it's traumatic. it's traumatic. it's a tough thing for any kid. there was a time at our church where on new year's eve, when we had our new year's eve celebration, as soon as the clock turned 12:00, we knew it was 12:00 because we could hear the gunfire outside our church. that hasn't happened in recent years. but that's a frightening thing to know that on new year's eve, you might get hit by a stray bullet. >> and it happens. it happens. but i also think, you know, in thinking about our administrative assistant we had whose son was shot and killed on easter sunday. he came out on the porch to talk to another kid, sho
the army and were recently able to overtake the city of goma despite a large u.n. security presence there. the house armed services committee hosts this hearing. this is three hours. i can't help but reflect on the millions of innocent people around the world who are caught in fundamentally unjust and socially complex situations. these situations can make anyone's heart break and naturally leads one to consider the simple question what can be done. one thing it sure makes me appreciate our country. i have heard that less than 2% of the people that have ever lived here on the earth have lived under the kind of freedoms that we enjoy. we are so blessed. and when we see how innocent lives are -- how people are hurt so much by some of the thing that is are happening around the world, it just again really makes me appreciate home. the question and likewise the answer becomes more complex as we contemplate what can be done within the context of u.s. national security interest constrained budgets ongoing commitments around the globe and potential future contingencies that the military has to be
not bomb from the air civilian targets and they didn't by and large. the liftoff had always said announcements and penalties for people who violated the strict instructions not to cause civilian damage until about a year into the war then made a navigation error, struck the city of london, the docks of london. churchill says, i'll show you how that works. the bomb our civilian targets, obama berlin. he bones milan. ... one, berlin is 100 on london. perot loses the war, but he destroys london's -- london from the air. and, of course, the british and the americans who had this was a war crime remembered that deal. by the end of the war, no one had the nerve to bring charges that nuremberg for the war crime of civilian bombing from the air . that tells us, i think, how even if we had in agreement with the other side of of cyber war have those laws would actually play out. we would not be able to contain a cyber war anymore than we could contain bombing from the air, which means that essentially we are engaged in a fool's errand to try and get legal norms on cyber war. it is not goin
was carry the large maps and it took a long time to find the information. >> it saves the city time and money. you are not taking up the time of a particular employee at the assessor's office. you might be doing things more efficient. >> they have it ready to go and say, this is what i want. >> they are finding the same things happening on the phone where people call in and
use the internet. what we used to do was carry the large maps and it took a long time to find the information. >> it saves the city time and money. you are not taking up the time of a particular employee at the assessor's office. you might be doing things more efficient. >> they have it ready to go and say, this is what i want. >> they are finding the same things happening on the phone where people call in and ask, how do i find this information? we say, go to this website and they go and get the information easily. >> a picture tells a thousand stories. some say a map
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

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